How do I describe methodology?

What (Exactly) Is Research Methodology?A Plain-Language Explanation & Definition (With Examples)By:Derek Jansen (MBA)and Kerryn Warren (PhD)| June 2020If youve started working

How do I describe methodology?

What (Exactly) Is Research Methodology?
A Plain-Language Explanation & Definition (With Examples)

By:Derek Jansen (MBA)and Kerryn Warren (PhD)| June 2020

If youve started working on your first piece of formal research  be it a dissertation, thesis or research project  youre probably feeling a little overwhelmed by all the technical lingo that gets thrown around. Research methodology, research methods, data collection and analysis it seems never-ending.

Research Methodology 101

In this post, well explain in plain, straightforward language:

  1. What exactly research methodology means
  2. What qualitative, quantitative and mixedmethodologies are
  3. What sampling design is, and what the main sampling options are
  4. What the most common data collection methods are
  5. What the most common data analysis methods are
  6. How to choose your research methodology

What is research methodology?

Research methodology simply refers to the practical how of any given piece of research. More specifically, its abouthowa researchersystematically designs a studyto ensure valid and reliable results that address the research aims and objectives.

For example, how did the researcher go about deciding:

  • Whatdata to collect (and what data to ignore)
  • Whoto collect it from (in research, this is called sampling design)
  • How tocollectit (this is called data collection methods)
  • How toanalyseit (this is called data analysis methods)

In a dissertation, thesis, academic journal article (or pretty much any formal piece of research), youll find a research methodology chapter (or section) which covers the aspects mentioned above. Importantly, a good methodology chapter in a dissertation or thesis explains notjustwhat methodological choices were made, but also explainswhythey were made.

In other words, the methodology chapter shouldjustifythe design choices, by showing that the chosen methods and techniques are the best fit for the research aims and objectives, and will provide valid and reliable results.A good research methodology provides scientifically sound findings, whereas a poor methodology doesnt. Well look at the main design choices below.

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What are qualitative, quantitative and
mixed-method methodologies?

Qualitative, quantitative and mixed-methodsare different types of methodologies, distinguished by whether they focus on words, numbers or both. This is a bit of an oversimplification, but its a good starting point for understandings. Lets take a closer look.

Qualitative research refers to research which focuses on collecting and analysing words (written or spoken) and textual data, whereas quantitative research focuses on measurement and testing using numerical data. Qualitative analysis can also focus on other softer data points, such as body language or visual elements.

Its quite common for a qualitative methodology to be used when the research aims and objectives areexploratoryin nature. For example, a qualitative methodology might be used to understand peoples perceptions about an event that took place, or a candidate running for president.

Contrasted to this, a quantitative methodology is typically used when the research aims and objectives areconfirmatoryin nature. For example, a quantitative methodology might be used to measure the relationship between two variables (e.g. personality type and likelihood to commit a crime) or to test a set of hypotheses.

As youve probably guessed, the mixed-method methodology attempts to combine the best of both qualitative and quantitative methodologies to integrate perspectives and create a rich picture.

Qualitative, quantitative and mixed-methods are different approaches, distinguished by their focus on words, numbers or both.
Qualitative, quantitative and mixed-methods are different approaches, distinguished by their focus on words, numbers or both.

What are the main sampling design approaches?

As we mentioned earlier, sampling design is about deciding who youre going to collect your data from (i.e. your sample). There are many sample options, but the two main categories of sampling design areprobabilitysampling andnon-probabilitysampling.

Probability samplingmeans that you use acompletely randomsample from the group of people youre interested in (this group is called the population). By using a completely random sample, the results of your study will begeneralisableto the entire population. In other words, you can expect the same results across the entire group, without having to collect data from the entire group (which is often not possible for large groups).

Non-probability sampling, on the other hand,doesnt use a random sample. For example, it might involve using a convenience sample, which means youd interview or survey people that you have access to (perhaps your friends, family or work colleagues), rather than a truly random sample (which might be difficult to achieve due to resource constraints). With non-probability sampling, the results are typically not generalisable.

Sampling is an important aspect of the research methodology
Sampling is an important aspect of the research methodology

What are the main data collection methods?

There are many different options in terms of how you go about collecting data for your study. However, these options can be grouped into the following types:

  • Interviews (which can be unstructured, semi-structured or structured)
  • Focus groups and group interviews
  • Surveys (online or physical surveys)
  • Observations
  • Documents and records
  • Case studies

The choice of which data collection method to use depends on your overall research aims and objectives, as well as practicalities and resource constraints. For example, if your research is exploratory in nature, qualitative methods such as interviews and focus groups would likely be a good fit. Conversely, if your research aims to measure specific variables or test hypotheses, large-scale surveys that produce large volumes of numerical data would likely be a better fit.

Choosing the right data collection method to use depends on your overall research aims and objectives, as well as practicalities.
Choosing the right data collection method to use depends on your overall research aims and objectives, as well as practicalities.

What are the main data analysis methods?

Data analysis methods can be grouped according to whether the research is qualitative or quantitative.

Popular data analysis methods in qualitative research include:

  • Qualitative content analysis
  • Thematic analysis
  • Discourse analysis
  • Narrative analysis
  • Grounded theory
  • IPA

Qualitative data analysis all begins with data coding, after which one (or more) analysis technique is applied.

Popular data analysis methods in quantitative research include:

  • Descriptive statistics (e.g. means, medians, modes)
  • Inferential statistics (e.g. correlation, regression, structural equation modelling)

Again, the choice of which data collection method to use depends on your overall research aims and objectives, as well as practicalities and resource constraints.

Time to analyse
Time to analyse

How do I choose a research methodology?

As youve probably picked up by now, your research aims and objectives have a major influence on the research methodology. So, the starting point for developing your research methodology is to take a step back and look at the big picture of your research, before you make methodology decisions. The first question you need to ask yourself is whether your research is exploratory or confirmatory in nature.

If your research aims and objectives are primarily exploratory in nature, your research will likely be qualitative and therefore you might consider qualitative data collection methods (e.g. interviews) and analysis methods (e.g. qualitative content analysis).

Conversely, if your research aims and objective are looking to measure or test something (i.e. theyre confirmatory), then your research will quite likely be quantitative in nature, and you might consider quantitative data collection methods (e.g. surveys) and analyses (e.g. statistical analysis).

Designing your research and working out your methodology is a large topic, which well cover in other posts. For now, however, the key takeaway is that you should always start with your research aims and objectives.Every methodology decision will flow from that.

Psst theres more (for free)

This post is part of our research writing mini-course, which covers everything you need to get started with your dissertation, thesis or research project.Check out the free course

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